Tag Archives: KM Principles

Knowledge Management and Finance/Accounting

Some of you, who know me, will know that I started out my career in accounting; I have an undergraduate degree in accounting and was going to be a Chartered Accountant. This is also how I got my start in KM, although it wasn’t called KM then, it was just how you worked—checklists and reusing last year’s files, talking to the staff who had worked on the audit/tax last year. If you had worked on the engagement the year before you were expected to be quicker in the subsequent year(s) because you were familiar with the client and the file. 15+ years into my knowledge management career, I still run into organizations that think that in order to help them better manage their knowledge that I have to be a specialist in whatever their content is, e.g. if it’s a law firm, I have to be a lawyer, if it’s a manufacturer I have to be an engineer, if it’s a hospital I have to be a doctor or a nurse or some other medical professional. This isn’t always true, there are lots of organizations that understand that KM is a series of processes and activities, largely independent of the … Continue reading

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KM Standards vs. Principles

Wow, it’s been a long time since I posted a blog; I’ve been busy working with new clients and I just haven’t had any earth-shattering KM thoughts to share; no ba in my schedule lately. [Aside: I wrote this for a side-project that I’m working on, so it may eventually appear somewhere in another format.] There seems to be a lot of talk about KM standards lately, so here are some initial thoughts I had… What does “standards” mean? According to Wikipedia, standards are “any norm, convention or requirement.” What does “principles” mean? Again, according to Wikipedia, principles are “a law or rule that has to be, or usually is to be followed, or can be desirably followed, or is an inevitable consequence of something.” How are they different? Principles are abstract, whereas standards provide something to be compared to/measured against; standards are more tangible. How are they the same? They can both be used to provide direction, guidance, and/or insight into a situation. As with everything we have to come to a common understanding, a common lexicon. We have to figure out what terms and ideas mean in our own context and in the context of the organization or … Continue reading

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